Assets and infrastructure

Positive change

Real net capital stock per person rose 33 percent from 1991 to 2015

  • Image, assets and infrastructure
    • The volume of real net capital stock rose 74.3 percent from 1991 to 2015.
    • The increase per person, which takes into account the population increase over the same period, was 33 percent.
    • Long-term changes in the stock of produced capital are an indication of the wealth of New Zealand. 

     

    1. 2009/10 prices.
    Note: This graph is interactive. Hover over the data points to see the exact values.

    View source data 

    The source data for this indicator is available from Statistics NZ's national accounts and population statistics. To view these go to Infoshare and enter these table references in the search box: SNE064AA and DPE055AA. 

    Changes we made to the source data

    To create a measure of real net capital stock per person, we divided the source data of real net capital stock by the resident population.

    Definition and measure

    Real net capital stock is a measure of New Zealand’s wealth in productive assets. This includes fixed assets, such as machinery, equipment, buildings, and infrastructure that can be used in production for more than one year.

    The real net stock of total assets represents accumulated investment, less retirements and accumulated depreciation for assets still operating (that is, gross capital stock less accumulated depreciation on assets still in operation). Ensuring that a broad base of assets is maintained can increase opportunities for future economic development.

    This indicator is expressed in 2009/10 dollars, to remove the effect of price changes.

    Technical changes since 2010

    The real GDP series is now expressed in 2009/10 prices instead of 1995/96 prices. Preview of 2014 national accounts improvements has more information about this change.

    The starting date for the assets and infrastructure indicator is 1991, not 1988, which it was in Key findings on New Zealand's progress using a sustainable development approach: 2010. This reflects the methodology change in 1991 to use ‘resident population’ instead of ‘de facto population’ in national population estimates.

    De facto population estimates measure the number of people present in an area at a point in time, including people who live elsewhere (such as overseas). The resident population makes an allowance for residents who are undercounted (missed) and overcounted (counted more than once), or temporarily overseas on census night.

    Since we published Key findings on New Zealand's progress using a sustainable development approach: 2010, we revised the practice of linking de facto and resident population estimates to create a continuous population series.

    The real net capital stock per person series is now calculated from 1991 onwards using the concept of resident population.  

    Previous publications

    Key findings on New Zealand's progress using a sustainable development approach: 2010
    Measuring New Zealand's progress using a sustainable development approach: 2008
    Key findings on New Zealand's progress using a sustainable development approach: 2008

    Page updated June 2016

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