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Disabled people in rentals most likely to be cold at home

Thirty-eight percent of those disabled people in rented homes said they have difficulty heating, Stats NZ said today.

The rate for non-disabled people in rented housing was 27 percent. Difficulty staying warm was less common for disabled people who live in an owner-occupied home at about 20 percent.

Proportions having difficulty heating home, by disability status and housheld tenure, 2013
Findings from the 2013 Disability Survey showed people in rented homes were more likely than people in owner-occupied to report difficulty keeping their house warm.

More than 30 percent of disabled people who rent experience damp. The rate for non-disabled renters was just less than 25 percent.

“A cold, damp house is more common for disabled people than non-disabled,” wellbeing and housing statistics manager Litia Tapu said. Overall, 24 percent of disabled people living in rented houses reported both cold and damp, compared with 15 percent of non-disabled people.

The 2013 Disability Survey also found one in six people with an impairment (16 percent) needed some modification to their homes – most commonly changes to their bathroom. One in four (25 percent) disabled people with a physical impairment needed bathroom modifications and about one in six (17 percent) said they needed changes to their home entranceway.

See Disability and housing conditions: 2013 for more details.

For media enquires contact: James Weir, 021-285-9191, info@stats.govt.nz

Published 14 March 2017

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